Gypsy Traveller Students in Secondary Schools

by Chris Derrington

Publisher: Trentham Books

Written in English
Cover of: Gypsy Traveller Students in Secondary Schools | Chris Derrington
Published: Pages: 186 Downloads: 944
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Subjects:

  • Secondary schools,
  • Teaching of specific groups,
  • Education / Teaching,
  • Education,
  • United Kingdom, Great Britain,
  • Secondary,
  • Education / Secondary
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages186
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL12040553M
ISBN 101858563208
ISBN 109781858563206

  Perceptions of behaviour and patterns of exclusion: Gypsy Traveller students in English secondary schools. J Research in Spec Educ Needs, 5(2), pp Report. in schools, (31 staff); Traveller Support teachers (15); Gypsy Traveller young people (18) and some parents (7). We also interviewed six young Occupational (Show) Travellers and some parents (10). There was evidence that Gypsy Travellers are likely to be at greater risk of disciplinary exclusion than otherFile Size: KB. managers, in twelve schools, urban and rural, where Travellers were known to have attended and with Show Traveller parents (10) and young people (6) and Gypsy Traveller parents (7) and young people (18) in different parts of Scotland. Traveller support workers, mainly teachers, were also interviewed (15).File Size: KB. Article. Derrington, C. and Kendall, S. () Challenges and barriers to secondary education: the experiences of young gypsy traveller students in English secondary schools. Social Policy and Society. 7(1), pp. Derrington, C. () Fight, flight and playing white: an examination of coping strategies adopted by gypsy traveller adolescents in English secondary .

This paper examines inclusionary processes and examples of 'good practice' in primary and secondary schools for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils in one inner London Borough in the UK. It will explore the role of the Traveller Education Service (TES) and argue that the support provided by the TES to schools is essential for the development of 'good practice', but at the . (p. xi). This evocative image is contained in the Foreword to Gypsy Traveller students in secondary schools, written by a year-old Traveller child called Tammy. When this image is juxtaposed with Tammy’s aspiration “that one day the travelling culture will be accepted” (p. xi), the book’s focus on Traveller education. The underrepresentation of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils in higher education 3 Ellie Mulcahy is a Research Associate at LKMco and holds a PGCE with a specialism in the early years. She previously worked as a reception teacher in a school in Ramsgate, Kent. Welsh schools have seen a rise in Gypsy, Roma and traveller pupils attending and doing better in exams. As reported by the BBC, more children from Gypsy, traveller and Roma families in Wales are going back to school – but only half of youngsters from these communities continue their education into secondary school.. According to Estyn, the education experience for these .

  The purpose of this short film is to encourage future dialogues with Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) young people who are considering higher education and to improve inclusion of GRT students in. educational outcomes for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils are beginning to make an impact, as a group, these pupils remain amongst the most vulnerable (a term used in this report to refer to academic underachievement) in the education system. literature. Parents generally preferred their children to be with other Gypsy Traveller pupils in school but worried about scapegoating (Derrington and Kendall, ). • Although recognising the value of education, a number of sources suggest that some Traveller parents may see it as a source of ‘Gorgification’ (Bowers, , p13), aFile Size: KB. Gypsy/Traveller Education. Policy Development should create an action plan aimed at supporting the transition of young Gypsy/Travellers from primary to secondary school. Work with older Gypsy Traveller children not attending secondary schools by providing a route to community based Size: 83KB.

Gypsy Traveller Students in Secondary Schools by Chris Derrington Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buy Gypsy Traveller Students in Secondary Schools: a: Culture, Identity and Achievement by Derrington, Chris, Kendall, Sally (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(1). This book presents the findings from the first British national longitudinal study of Gypsy Traveller students in secondary schools. This unique phenomenological study, sponsored by the Nuffield Foundation, documents the educational experience of 44 Gypsy Travellers in.

The education of Gypsy Traveller pupils: An update on provision in secondary schools - June Summary The attendance rates of Gypsy Traveller pupils and Gypsy Traveller Students in Secondary Schools book attainment levels remain too low, despite the best efforts of many dedicated Traveller Education Service staff over a.

difference. Overall, the fact that Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils tend to have low prior attainment, have Special Education Needs and are entitled to Free School Meals is likely to be affected by cultural factors. • The NFER surveys of secondary and primary schools showed that specific support was in place for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller File Size: 2MB.

Review of C. Derrington & S. Kendall's publication, Gypsy Traveller Students in Secondary Schools: Culture, Identity and Achievement. Stoke on Trent, UK and Sterling USA: Trentham Books. (ISBN 1 8).

The book is concerned with English Gypsy Travellers (although six participants were Irish Travellers), as opposed to fairground or circus people and new age Author: Emilio A.

Anteliz, Phyllida Coombes, Patrick Alan Danaher. Gypsy & Traveller Education Improving educational outcomes for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils has been a focus of research and policy for some time and is particularly important for secondary age pupils.

Where Gypsy and Traveller pupils do. Gypsy traveller students in secondary schools: culture, identity and achievement. [Chris Derrington; Sally Kendall] Book: All Authors / Contributors: Chris Derrington; Sally Kendall.

Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: Get this from a library. Derrington, C. & Kendall, S. Gypsy traveller students in secondary schools: culture, identity and achievement.

Stoke on Trent, UK and Sterling USA: Trentham Books (ISBN 1 8) [Book review]. [Anteliz, Emilio A.; Coombes, Phyllida; Danaher, Patrick Alan] -- Review of C.

Derrington & S. Kendall's publication, Gypsy Traveller. The quality of this support is mostly good and in some cases very good. Gypsy Traveller learners generally have poor attendance rates and very few Gypsy Traveller learners attend a secondary school.

ost of the teaching of Gypsy Traveller learners Gypsy Traveller Students in Secondary Schools book of good quality, particularly in primary schools. Challenges and Barriers to Secondary Education: The Experiences of Young Gypsy Traveller Students in English Secondary Schools - Volume 7 Issue 1 - Cited by: made sufficient progress to narrow the gap between Traveller students and the rest of society (Themelis & Foster, ), while secondary education for people from Gypsy Traveller groups is inadequate (Law & Swann, ; Levinson & Hooley, ).

This paper will consider the cultural dissonance between Traveller and non-Traveller. Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) pupils are among the lowest achieving groups of pupils at every key stage of education, although some GRT pupils achieve very well at are many complex.

Derrington, C. and Kendall, S. () Gypsy Traveller Students in Secondary Schools: Culture, Identity and Achievement. Stoke-on-Trent: Trentham Books. • 40 students in 11 Secondary schools, • 20 children in pre-school settings. These children are from Gypsy Romany, Irish Traveller, Showman or New Traveller families.

Most live on private or county council sites, some are housed and a few live in unauthorised encampments. The Traveller Education Team consists of fte support staff andFile Size: 2MB. Derrington () argued that Gypsy Traveller students are less likely to complete secondary education than any other minority ethnic group, and Jordan () contended that Author: Chris Derrington.

The study is set within a national (and international) context where Gypsy Traveller children generally have limited access to secondary education. This ethnographic study tracked and recorded the educational progress and experiences of a sample of 44 Gypsy Traveller pupils of secondary school age over a three-year period.

This is music to the ears of Phien O'Reachtigan of the National Gypsy, Traveller and Roma Council, who says what happened at the.

The term Gypsy Roma Traveller refers to a number of quite different communities who share some similar characteristics, predominantly a travelling lifestyle or history of a travelling lifestyle. Many Gypsy Roma and Travellers have ethnic minority status and are therefore protected under the Equality Act Myers and Bhopal (forthcoming ) collate figures that suggest whilst only 4% of Gypsy and Traveller children were registered with LEA schools in.

Section 3. Learning Provision. How good is the quality of the care and education we offer Traveller children and young people. This section aligns with existing policy and guidance to illustrate where practitioners can improve outcomes for Travellers.

This chapter seeks to draw attention to the longer-term educational consequences of poor inclusion and access in primary and secondary schooling for Gypsy and Traveller pupils.

In this chapter the authors’ evidence the way in which barriers in primary and secondary school affect access and inclusion in Higher Education as these issues are not Cited by: 1. So said one of the parents we spoke to as part of our research back inafter My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding first aired on Channel 4.

During that research into Gypsy, Traveller and Roma (GRT) pupils’ progression to higher education, we heard how the programme incited a wave of racist bullying towards Gypsy and Traveller children. This paper examines inclusionary processes and examples of "good practice" in primary and secondary schools for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils in one inner London Borough in the UK.

It will explore the role of the Traveller Education Service (TES) and argue that the support provided by the TES to schools is essential for the development of "good practice", but at the Cited by: Julie wrote: "Confused is the first book about a gypsy or Irish traveller?" Someone else added that book to this list.

Apparently they didn't read the description. It is not about a gypsy or traveler. I don't know how to remove it, that book doesn't even belong here. Practice for Gypsy Traveller Pupils (Bhopal et al., ). Its main aims were to address issues of low attendance and achievement for Gypsy Traveller pupils in a number of primary and secondary schools.

There was particular emphasis on examining some of the contribut-ory factors associated with the poor attendance and underachieve. Gypsy Traveller pupils, mostly either Gypsy/Roma or Travellers of Irish Heritage, have the lowest results of any ethnic minority group and are the groups most at risk in the education system.

This is not a new issue. The Swann report2 identified Gypsy Traveller pupils as being strongly affected by many factors influencing the education of. with families and schools recognise that the UK has a long way to go before genuine equal - ity is achieved in education for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller Communities.

This article pro-vides evidence that, in the field of education, Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities suf-fer manifestly unequal outcomes. DrawingFile Size: KB. Gypsy Traveller Students in Secondary Schools: Culture, Identity and Achievement.

Stoke on Trent: Trentham Books. The book presents and discusses the findings from the first national study of Gypsy Traveller students in English secondary schools.

The. The trailer is symbolic of the school's approach towards its 10% Gypsy Roma Traveller (GRT) population. For St Joseph's, equality Author: Rowenna Davis.

References. Cemlyn S and Ryder A () ‘Gypsy, Roma and Traveller Communities’, in Peterson A, Hattam R, Zembylas M and Arthur J (eds) The Palgrave International Handbook of Education for Citizenship and Social Justice, Basingstoke: Palgrave Derrington C and Kendall S () Gypsy traveller students in secondary schools: culture.

Derrington, C. (). Fight, flight and playing white: An examination of coping strategies adopted by Gypsy Traveller adolescents in English secondary schools.

International Journal of Educational Research, 46(6), – CrossRef Google ScholarAuthor: Dave Cudworth.Barriers to learning: Gypsy, Traveller and Roma communities In2Teaching met with Anne Davidson, Principal Teacher in Primary Gypsy/Traveller/Roma Education within the Hospital and Outreach Teaching Service (HOTS), to talk about the support that HOTS provides to children from Gypsy, Traveller and Roma communities.Promoting the social inclusion and academic progress of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller children: A secondary school case study By Siobhan A.E.

Boot For the degree of Educational Psychology Doctorate School of Education University of Birmingham January